Currently set to Index
Currently set to Follow

Guide To Lions & Types Of Lions

Guide To Lions & Types Of Lions

About Lions

Lions are the second largest members of the cat family. Adults males typically weigh 66 to 250 kg (differs for most Types Of Lions), females 37 to 159 kg. Their size and weight vary depending on their geographic locality, with Asiatic lions usually smaller than their African cousins. Lion cubs are born big for their size though they’re tiny compared to adult lions.

The mane is highly developed in males, appearing fuller when roused or agitated, toweling dry after a drink or during defecation. Females also have a mane but it’s short and thin without any regal appearance.

Male lions possess long canine teeth capable of exerting up to 200 kg/sq cm bite pressure (same as tigers) and of puncturing a human’s skull. The claws are retracted when walking but extended when attacked, making the lion a formidable physical opponent.

Ecology

Ecology

Lions are the only social cats. They live in prides, groups of related females and their offspring, usually numbering 5-15 individuals but sometimes over 40. Males hold a tenuous position within a pride’s social hierarchy, unable to establish permanent relationships with anyone female because the next alpha male will kill them when he takes over the pride.

The males can easily leave a group if it is going downhill but they may be forced to stay if conditions improve for them. In Kruger Park adult males have been known to take over pride from another adult male that has died or been killed by a man.

The dominant lioness holds a high rank in the pride and is highly protective of her cubs from both outside threats and from her own daughters. This high level of infanticide within the pride is believed to result from the close bond that exists between lionesses and their cubs, with protectiveness extended to other females’ offspring only when there are no regular moves by a lioness to take over a pride.

Behaviour & Habitat

Behaviour & Habitat

Lions and Types Of Lions are found in savannah, floodplains and desert fringes. They originally occupied Africa’s grassy plains but hunting by man has forced them to adapt to more arid conditions.

Lions are mainly nocturnal hunters spending the day basking in the sun or sleeping- they can however be active at any time of day or night if necessary. Their resting rumbles are so deep that they shake the ground when heard from a distance.

Lions roar to warn other pride to keep away, advertise their presence to females in heat or when hunting, and establish territories. They can however purr like domestic cats when content.

Social life

Social life

Females do the hunting while males protect the pride’s territory against intruders. When he takes over a new pride, a male will try to make all its existing cubs disperse; if they don’t leave voluntarily he’ll kill them (usually after mating with their mother) so that his offspring will inherit the group’s females and territory. If two or more young males are present they’ll form an alliance against this strange male but one of them must inevitably leave the group to become nomadic; it often dies before reaching maturity owing to the lack of cooperation and acceptance by adult males.

A lioness has an estrus cycle of about 3 weeks; she’ll mate with several different males over this period, who’ll fight among themselves to gain mating privileges. Once impregnated she gives birth after 3 months and suckles her cubs for up to 2 years. The pride’s dominant female will kill any young cubs not related to her as soon as they’re born by rolling on them or sitting on them until they die from suffocation.

Living Conditions

Living Conditions

Lions are social animals so it is advisable to keep a group together if possible rather than house cats individually. They do best when provided with plenty of space and items that allow them to fulfill their natural instincts- these include hiding places, elevated areas and swimming pools.

Types Of Lions

  1. Safari lion

The usual types of lions raised in captivity for petting purposes, arrived at through the practice of culling cubs from their mothers before they are 6 weeks old.

  1. Trans-located lions

These Types of Lions that have been moved to a reserve or park because their habitat has become unsuitable for some reason (e.g game farm development). They may be adults or young animals born in the wild and later captured when too closely associated with humans; in both cases translocation is an emergency measure only to be used when no other solution is possible nor acceptable, e.g poaching.

  1. Captive-born lions

These are usually reared by their mother but hand-reared or fostered onto another lactating female if she dies.

  1. Fostered cubs

These Types Of Lions are kept with their mother for as long as possible, after which they’re fostered onto another lactating female in the pride- e.g those that lost her own cubs through infanticide or those that can’t produce sufficient milk to feed all her offspring.

  1. Asiatic Lions

These are confined to the Gir National Park in India where they have been fully protected since 1957- they can never be rewilded or translocated successfully because of their loss of fear and dependency on humans.

Interesting Facts About Lion

Interesting Facts About Lion

  1. In the wild, lions live for up to 12 years but in captivity they can reach 20 years old.
  2. Lions have been known to swim long distances and cross rivers to take over a pride from another male or gain access to a female in heat- they don’t however enjoy water and will avoid crossing pools if possible so as not to wet their fur which loses its insulating properties when wet.
  3. Lion’s milk is very rich and contains about 50% fat so cubs only need two feedings daily while they’re suckling; after weaning they eat meat exclusively (except for supplements of fat or bone marrow during times of food scarcity).
  4. The name ‘lion’ has evolved from the Latin word ‘leon-‘ from which derive words such as ‘elephant’, ‘leopard’ and the Greek word ‘leon’ meaning lion.
  5. Lions don’t actually roar all that often- they mostly use a deep growl, moaning or purring sound which can be heard for over 5 km away.
  6. The male lion possesses a long black tuft on his tail which he displays during breeding periods by making circles with it while walking in an undulating manner. He also has a mane of course! A female’s mane is smaller and sparser than a male’s- she may also have a crest behind her neck when in estrus (heat).

Conclusion

Conclusion

We at today sports news think that lions are magnificent animals displaying all the characteristics of their species- they are generally placid when housed correctly in captivity, but can become dangerous when stressed. They should not be kept as pets for this reason and because their life span is usually much shorter than that of other household pets.

It is possible to keep a lion/lioness successfully in captivity but it requires expert advice beforehand, correct housing facilities, and regular human contact with them from an early age which allows you to bond closely with them without endangering yourself or your family members.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *